Celia Aaron-The Elder

Celia Aaron writes stories that take place down in the deep South, Louisiana and Mississippi. I really enjoy her stories. You should go check out Blackwood. I cannot recommend that one enough. You get some dark and sexy along with mystery and intrigue. That’s a recipe I can get behind. But this review is about The Elder, the first book of the Mississippi Kings series. I’m sticking this in the romance section because it has a romance that runs through it, but it’s not the primary focus of the book, which is why it’s also under the mystery category. I would call it a murder mystery suspenseful thriller with some romance, instead of a romance with some murder mystery going on.

Anyway, let’s get on with the story, shall we? Benton King, the elder of the 3 King children, works in the law firm of King and Morris with his father. One morning, he goes to work and opens his father’s office door to find him sitting at his desk with a hole in his head. In their quiet, very small town of Azalea, Mississippi, the murder rate is something like 1/year. In fact, their police force was tiny, and only had 2 detectives on the entire force, Arabella Matthews and her partner, Logan. When Benton calls in the police, she gets the call, since she is the senior detective. The chief has been staying at the hospital with his daughter who is in a coma.

Benton, along with his brother Porter, who is the county sheriff and totally unsuited and underqualified for his job, is waiting for the police, and are both angry about the chief not showing up and sending in the “B team”.

Arabella knows damn good and well that she’s not part of any B team. She’s good at her job, determined, dogged, and stubborn. She wants to make sure that her town is safe, and she will do everything she can to do that. Arabella walks into the murder scene and takes control. She just lets the crap that Benton is spewing just pass her by. She gets that he’s sad and angry, but she’s there to solve a murder and she’s not going to let him derail her, no matter what. When he refuses to hand over information about what his dad was working on, she says OK, that’s fine, we’ll go see the judge in this kind of hearing and this, that, and the other, and I’ll get to look at them. Celia’s background as a recovering lawyer does show up in this.

When a second murder turns up, connected to the King murder, the stress that Arabella feels just gets worse. At least Benton has decided to stop giving her a hard time, and now he’s decided that he’s going to help her, and gets his brother to deputize him as part of the country department. This is when the romance really gets started too.

The story is really well written. The legal stuff is all well done, since see above recovering lawyer. I’ve never lived in a town as small as Azalea, but I’ve lived in small towns, and she sure got the politics and culture of a small town right. I do like Benton, although I want to pull his head out of his ass sometimes because he gets a little too me man, you woman, me protect at times, but I get why he did that.

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Vivi definitely steals the show whenever she’s on stage. She’s a force to be reckoned with when she’s 4. I’m glad I don’t have to deal with her when she’s 16. She’s going to give everyone a run for their money and then some.

I totally didn’t see the end coming. That was a total shock, I mean jaw hitting the floor shock. But, going back and looking, I can see some small hints of it, but not a lot, which is how I like my mysteries. I don’t like figuring them out before the author gets to the denouement. I like finding out as the characters do, in an organic way. Celia did really well with this.

If you like a healthy dose of mystery and suspense with some romance, then this is definitely a book you should check out. Happy reading!

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